Meet Robert Greene

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Robert Greene is an East Coast artist/sculptor who resides in Ledyard CT. His work deals primarily with the human condition. The activity of the mind and nervous system is his main inspiration. Graduating from Eastern Connecticut State University in 2006, he went on to pursue a Master's in Fine Art at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth in 2010, receiving his Master's in 2013. He is currently a full time Assistant Professor of sculpture in the Department of Art and Art History at Eastern Connecticut State University. His sculptures have gained recognition along the East Coast with many pieces in both private and public collections. His work has been mentioned from local newspapers to the Boston Globe. Recently Robert had a sculpture featured in the New York Times where it was highlighted in a prominent room the Annual Kips Bay Decorator Show House. Robert's work has also been seen in The Architectural Digest, Huffington Post and many papers and blogs. He continues to exhibit in conjunction with staying busy creating original pieces and making new discoveries in his studio in Ledyard. He enjoys nurturing the creative minds of his students by engaging them in thought provoking projects. He believes that creativity and innovation go hand in hand.

Everybody has the creative potential; there is nothing more rewarding than seeing a students' excitement when they discover exactly what they can make with their own hands

A Word From Robert

My graduate experience has allowed me to break down conventional walls and truly look within myself as an artist in today’s world. I now know my voice and my vision and what I want from my work. I consider myself a figurative sculptor; however, rather than expressing the human figure through precise anatomical structure I now represent the human form through abstracted structures derived from both the figure and the human condition.

I choose wood as my primary material as it is familiar and warm and quite simply feels right in my hands. Wood can be rendered and shaped in countless ways or left natural to express the already inherent beauty and characteristics it naturally possesses. I tend to think of my work as drawings crafted in wood and by doing so, I strive to attain a frenetic quality in the sculpture that has some level of control over the material while also expressing some level of chaos. The lines and connections are controlled and condensed in some areas while loose and chaotic in others. Using wood that has been cut into a variety of lengths and thicknesses, I work additively to create forms that are representative of the human condition.

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